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Environment.fudan.edu.cn

23 September, Fudan University, China International Symposium on Innovation in Sustainability: Air, Water and Materials Registered charity number 207890 with the world's leading chemistry community and join our 51,000 members globally Registered charity number: 207890 041536 China Membership_advert_A4_Chinese.indd 1 11/06/2015 09:08:31 Welcome address from the Royal Society of Chemistry
The Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) is delighted to be co-organising the 6th Unilever-RSC International Symposium on Innovation in Sustainability: Air, Water and Materials. Since 2010, the Unilever R&D Centre in Shanghai and the Royal Society of Chemistry have collaborated to organise a series of highly successful international symposia in China. This year sees the 6th in this series on the theme of innovation in sustainability and we very much appreciate the commitment of Unilever in supporting and co-organising this symposium. We are also very grateful to the host and local organisers from the Department of Environmental Science and Engineering at Fudan University for their excellent organisation and enthusiasm, in particular Prof Xin Yang, Prof Lin Wang and Mr Luwei Zhao. The Royal Society of Chemistry is the world's leading chemistry community, advancing excellence in the chemical sciences. With over 51,000 members and a knowledge business that spans the globe, we are the UK's professional body for chemical scientists, supporting and representing our members and bringing together chemical scientists from all over the world. As a not-for-profit organisation with a heritage over 170 years, we have an ambitious international vision. Around the world, we partner with industry and academia to promote talents and ideas leading to great advances in chemical sciences. Within China the RSC has two offices in Beijing and Shanghai headed by our General Manager for China, Dr Amy Lam. In total there are twenty-two full-time staff members who are all very happy to provide more information about the RSC including strategic partnerships, professional events, membership services, and publishing activities. In addition the Royal Society of Chemistry has launched a Chinese language website, please visit www.rsc.org.cn and let us know what you think.
The Royal Society of Chemistry is committed to ensuring that the chemical sciences contribute to their full potential in tackling the major global challenges of today and tomorrow, including issues of sustainable growth and development. Individuals, communities, companies, and nations all have a role to play in tackling global challenges, in order to provide every person in every country with clean air, water and novel materials in an environmentally and economically sustainable way. We are pleased to partner with Unilever and the Department of Environmental Science and Engineering at Fudan University to deliver this exciting one day meeting bringing academia and industry together to address these challenges in sustainability. We hope that the lectures, poster presentations and panel discussions will stimulate the exchange of ideas and experiences between all participants, setting a strong platform for discussion. We thank each of the speakers, poster presenters, and participants for their contributions. Again welcome to what promises to be an exciting symposium. We hope that this event will act as a springboard for future activities and that it will help in fostering new research collaborations and in inspiring the delegates in both academia and industry.
Dr Sarah Thomas
Dr Chunxiao Zheng
Dr Guoxi (Justin) Xu
Senior International RSC China - Chief Representative RSC China – Representative Development Manager Royal Society of Chemistry, Royal Society of Chemistry Beijing, China Royal Society of Chemistry Cambridge, UK Shanghai, China Welcome address from Unilever
A warm welcome to all of you for the 6th Unilever-RSC International Symposium this year entitled Innovation in
Sustainability: Air, Water and Materials. Unilever is one of the top fast moving consumer goods companies in the
world with annual sales of nearly €50 billion and a high ranking amongst Fortune Global 500 and FTSE 100 companies. Today Unilever defines its purpose as "Make Sustainable Living Commonplace" and it was one of the first companies in the world to tie a growth agenda to a corporate commitment to sustainability. Many of the big challenges of sustainability demand new science and technology to bring forward the most effective solutions worldwide. Challenges such as air pollution/poor quality air, scarcity of fresh water and increasing waste due to material consumption are fast becoming major problems facing not just companies, or countries, like China, but in fact the entire world population. Problems of this magnitude and impact present opportunities for innovation too. And this was the inspiration behind the theme of this year's symposium. Unilever came to China in 1923 and established its first operation in Shanghai, manufacturing and selling Sunlight and Lux soap bars. History moved on, and as China re-opened its door, Unilever re-entered China in 1986; and has since cumulatively invested more than $2 billion to grow its business. Today, we have built up a dynamic and fast growing business. Our most successful global brands, e.g. Omo, Dove, Lux, Clear, Lifebuoy, Pond's, Comfort, Lipton, Knorr, LYNX, Rexona, CIF, Wall's and Unilever Pureit, as well as some local brands, e.g. Zhonghua and Hazeline, have become well known and preferred among Chinese consumers. As one of the largest consumer markets, China is of high strategic importance for Unilever. To fulfil our ambitious growth goal in China requires us to fully understand the needs of the Chinese consumers, and to develop advanced technologies to meet their needs. As one of six global R&D laboratories, Unilever Research China was formally founded in October 2003. In September 2009, a new R&D centre, with an investment of €50m was officially opened in Shanghai Linkong Economic Development Zone. It has become one of the major global innovation centres of Unilever with world-class capabilities in research and development for all Unilever business. Research is particularly strong in chemistry and functional materials science with a clear focus on the discovery of novel particles, polymeric and natural materials, and their application in Personal Care products.
Our people are the most valuable assets of the R&D centre. We are building a dedicated and outstanding team of young scientists, full of energy, enthusiasm, creativity and confidence. They have top qualifications and expertise; most are graduated in China and more than 60% have overseas work experience; we also have a great gender balance, in fact, more than half of our team are women scientists. We nurture a culture of ‘delivery to the marketplace'. In such a culture people are highly motivated to energetically drive their innovation programmes. They are encouraged to think and work in varied ways, in order to develop break-through technologies of great worth. We have built an outstanding external network in China, to supplement our extremely broad and well established Global network. We have close, trusting and productive collaborations with leading academicians from China's top Universities and Governmental Institutes.
Taking all these aspects together, our laboratory has consequently invented a wide range of new materials. The novelty of our work has resulted in a large number of patents and publications. Some of them have already been used successfully in new products, despite the short history of our laboratory, and they are adding great value to both our consumers and our business. Today, we all strive to build our laboratory into the best in the industry; and to develop more and more technical breakthroughs to catalyse the value we can bring to consumers around the world through bigger, better and faster sustainable innovation. Unilever are proud to again be supporting this series of exciting one day meetings and sincerely thank our hosts and local organisers at Fudan University for all their help in arranging the meeting. We also thank each of the speakers, poster presenters and participants – without whom there would not be a symposium! We very much hope you will be stimulated by all the presentations and I very much look forward to meeting you.
Jim Crilly
Senior Vice President, Strategic Science Group Unilever plc. Welcome address from Fudan University
Distinguished Guests and Dear Colleagues, As the local host, I am delighted to welcome you all to Fudan University for this Unilever-RSC International Symposium on Innovation in Sustainability. We are honoured to host this symposium in our campus.
Innovation in sustainability is an exciting, challenging and significant research field. Research on sustainability is a rewarding investment to the future. Your great work will benefit not just our generation, but also our children and grandchildren. So we are very delighted to bring together researchers and practitioners who are interested in water treatment, reusable materials, air quality control, and a wide range of domains and disciplines related to the sustainability. Your participation makes this symposium a great opportunity for us to learn, to share and to enjoy our great programs, presentations, and ideas on innovation in sustainability. I believe that this symposium will definitely promote our research work and foster collaborations.
Finally, my warm welcome to everyone again. I hope you would find the symposium inspiring and rewarding. Wish you all enjoy your stay in Shanghai! Wish the conference a great success! Prof Xin Yang
Prof Lin Wang
Department of Environmental Department of Environmental Science Science and Engineering Fudan University, China Fudan University, China Introduction to Fudan University
Fudan University, founded in 1905, is one of China's most prestigious and renowned universities. The name "Fudan" was cited from the famous lines "Brilliant are the sunshine and moonlight, again the morning glory after the night" in Confucian Classics, which implies the grand aspiration of rejuvenating education and developing the country. As a comprehensive research university of sciences, arts and medicine, Fudan boasts 36 schools and departments, and around 300 research institutes including 5 national key labs, 38 ministerial or provincial key labs and engineering centers, 5 "Project 985" Science and Technology Innovation Platforms and 7 "Project 985" Arts and Social Sciences Innovation Bases. Over the past hundred years, Fudan has made outstanding contributions to the country by developing talent, innovating in science and technology, carrying forward civilization, and serving society. The Department of Environmental Science and Engineering (ESE) is one of the youngest departments in Fudan University. ESE is established in 1996 in order to provide high-quality environmental science education and to conduct theoretical and applied research on China's environmental problems. Now the department has a faculty of 27 full-time professors (including 1 Cheung Kong Scholar, 2 Excellent Young Scholars of NSFC, and 1 awardee of the recruitment program of Global Youth Experts), 40 associate and assistant professors and 12 staff members. The faculty engages in a wide range of research areas from the cause and mechanism of air and water pollution to the sustainable development and the important global environmental challenges. Over the past one year, the ESE faculty has conducted 97 research projects, including 46 from National Science Foundation of China. The research work on the formation and impact of the aerosol pollution in China by Prof. Zhuang's group was awarded the Second Prize for National Natural Science Award in 2012. ESE is one of main hosts of Fudan Tyndall Center and Shanghai Key Laboratory of Atmospheric Pollution and Prevention (LAP3). Fudan Tyndall Center integrates the excellent discipline-based skills of Fudan University and the interdisciplinary experience and platforms of the UK-based Tyndall Centre so as to address the challenges China faces in climate and related environmental change. LAP3 is dedicated to understanding the atmospheric particle pollution mechanism and providing solutions to aerosol pollution control and prevention. Also, the department has developed collaborative partnership with institutes and schools from more than ten countries such as the USA, Japan, Germany, Britain, Canada, Norway, Denmark, Sweden and Finland.
Unilever Sustainable Living Plan
The Unilever Sustainable Living Plan
The Unilever Sustainable Living Plan
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fluctuate, markets become unstable and raw materials harder to source. In 2010 we launched the In 2010 we launched t Unilever Sustainable Living Plan
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ww.unile .com/sustainable-living/), which is our blueprint for sustainable business. W which is our blueprint for sustainable busie will achieve our vision through our Plan, which is helping us to ness. We wil achieve our vision through our Plan, which is helping decouple our growth from our environmental impact while increasing our positive social impact, driving profitable us to decouple our growth from our environmental impact while increasing our positive social impact, driving growth for our brands, saving costs and fueling innovation. profitable growth for our brands, saving costs and fueli The Unilever Sustainable Living Plan is our blueprint ng innovation. The Unilever Sustainable Living Plan is for achieving our vision to double the size of the business, whilst reducing our environmental footprint and our blueprint for achieving our vision to double the size of the business, whilst reducing our environmental increasing our positive social impact.
footprint and increasing our positive social impact. The Plan sets stretching targets to achieve by 2020 and includes how we source raw materials and how The Plan sets stretching targets to achieve by 2020 and includes how we source raw materials and how consumers use our brands. consumers use our brandsThe scale of our ambition means that we are finding new ways to partner with others . The scale of our ambition means that we are finding new ways to partner with in business, government and society others in business, government Improving Health
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By 2020 we wil help more By 2020 our goal is to halve the By 2020 we wil enhance than a bil ion people take environmental footprint of the the livelihoods of millions action to improve their making and use of our products of people as we grow our health and well-being. as we grow our business. By driving sustainability into every corner of our business, the Plan is opening up new opportunities and driving By driving sustainability into every corner of our business, the Plan is opening up new opportunities and • Through inno Through i vation and mark nnovation and m eting we ensure our products m arketing we ensure our producteet social needs and help people live s meet social needs and help people live nablThe more popular our brands become, the more we grow y. The more popular our brands become, the more w .
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6th Unilever-RSC International Symposium on Innovation in Sustainability: Air, Water and Materials Date: 23 September 2015
Venue: Crowne Plaza Shanghai Fudan, Shanghai, China
Introduction and welcome
Sustainable wastewater treatment in China: Challenges,
opportunities and emerging technologies
Prof Yongmei Li, Tongji University Fudan University SUSTAINABILITY: Big challenges for science and technology
Prof Jim Crilly, Strategic Science Group, Unilever R&D Coffee break
Towards a circular economy using green chemistry
Prof James Clark, University of York Unilever R&D Shanghai Properties of green solvents and their application in green
Prof Buxing Han, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences Evolution of biomass burning smoke particles in the dark
Prof Jianmin Chen, Fudan University Future of wastewater treatment with a focus on hazardous
Fudan University Prof Elise Cartmell, Cranfield University Coffee break
Development of surrogates to predict photochemical fate of
PPCPs in effluents
Prof Weihua Song, Fudan University Unilever R&D Shanghai Speech from one supplier of Unilever
Representative, WestRock Company Unilever R&D Shanghai Chair: Professor Xin Yang
Dean, Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai, China Email: yangxin@fudan.edu.cn Dr Yang is a full time professor in the Department of Environmental Science & Engineering, Fudan University. Dr Yang received his PhD degree from the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. Prior to joining Fudan in July 2006, Dr Yang worked as a research scientist at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, USA.
Dr Yang's research interests include the structure of micro-solvated complex anions and their interface behaviour; physical and chemical properties of atmospheric aerosol; urban air quality; atmospheric chemistry and its impact on global climate. He has published over 80 peer review journal papers. He has been the PI of 11 national level research projects including projects funded by the National Natural Science Foundation of China, Ministry of Education of China, Ministry of Science and Technology of China.
Co-chair: Professor Lin Wang
Deputy Dean, Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai, China Email: lin_wang@fudan.edu.cn Dr Lin Wang is the Deputy Dean of Department of Environmental Science & Engineering, Fudan University. He obtained Ph.D. in environmental toxicology from UC Riverside, USA in 2006. Prior to joining Fudan, Dr Wang worked as a postdoc and an assistant research scientist at UC Riverside and Texas A&M University, USA. His research focuses on atmospheric chemistry and physics. Now his group is studying new particle formation mechanism, SOA formation through heterogeneous and aqueous reactions, and how the particle ageing affects the hygroscopicity, CCN and optical properties of particles.
Dr Wang has published over 40 SCI papers. Dr Wang is an awardee of the prestigious 1000 Young Talents Program, a recipient of Excellent Young Scientist Program funded by NSFC, a receiver of the National Excellent Young Professional in Environmental Protection from the Ministry of Environmental Protection of China. Dr Wang is also an awardee of the Newton Advanced Fellowship.
Cranfield University, UK Professor Elise Cartmell is a chemist with a BSc(Hons) from The University of Edinburgh. She obtained her PhD in Environmental Engineering from Imperial College, London in 1997. Prior to joining Cranfield in 2000 she was a research scientist at WRc plc and is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry.
Professor Cartmell's research interests are associated with wastewater treatment with special reference to hazardous chemicals and energy recovery from anaerobic digestion. Her anaerobic research focuses on digestion optimisation and the integration with thermal processes for renewable energy production. Over the past ten years with Professor John Lester, she has established Cranfield as one of the centres of excellence in the analysis, environmental fate and treatment of hazardous chemicals and was on the steering group of the Water Utility Chemicals Investigation (CIP) programme. She leads the five year Severn Trent Wastewater Framework Research partnership with Atkins and is an Associate Editor for Critical Reviews in Environmental Science and Technology and is on the editorial board for Environmental Technology.
Her research group has been funded by a range of sources including the EPSRC, EU FP7, Defra, Drinking Water Inspectorate (DWi), Environment Agency (EA), UK Water Industry Research (UKWIR) plus industrial clients.
Jianmin Chen
Fudan University, China Prof. Jianmin Chen received his PhD on Physical Chemistry at Fudan University in July 1993. He is a University Distinguished Professor and the Director of the Shanghai Key Laboratory of Atmospheric Particle Pollution and Prevention (LAP3) within the Department of Environmental Science & Engineering at Fudan University. His research interests include aerosol chemistry, atmospheric heterogeneous reaction and the impact on climate change. His team is now focusing on laboratory study and field measurement of nucleation, biomass burning emission, and haze formation. In his group, a series of advanced instruments have been used such as aerosol chamber, wide-range particle spectrometer, ATOFMS, TDMA, Laser-CRDS, Nephelometer et al., to investigate aerosols' size distribution, hygroscopicity, optical property and chemical composition. Dr. Chen has published over 140 papers, 16 Chinese patents, and 3 co-edited books. He is PIs of 23 projects founded by NSFC, Ministry of Education of China, Framework Programme 7th, et al. He is the member of IUGG-China Group, IGAC-China Group, Associate Editor of Sci. Total Environ. and on 10 journal editorial boards. He received 16 honors and awards including the Baosteel Distinguished Teacher Award and the 1st Rank Award of Natural Sciences by the Ministry of Education.
James H. Clark
University of York, UK James Clark is Professor of Chemistry and Director of the Green Chemistry Centre of Excellence (GCCE) at the University of York. The GCCE is a world-leading research and education facility with 100 people working on the applications of green chemical technologies to the valorisation of biomass and other low value feedstocks. He has published over 400 articles and edited over 20 books. He has won numerous national and international awards, recently including the RSC Environment Prize, the SCI Chemistry for Industry award and an honorary doctorate from Gent University as well as prizes for his work on green chemical education from the US and UK. He has given Plenary lectures worldwide with an average of over 20 invited lectures a year. He also sits on the UK government Chemical Stakeholder Forum and the EU Bio-based Standards Plenary and Bio-based Experts Committees as well as the Eni Scientific Commission. He currently leads on research grants with value over €12M. Clark has led the green chemistry movement in Europe for 15 years and established the world's leading journal Green Chemistry and the Green Chemistry Network. He recently established the Global Green Chemistry Centres and the EU COST Action Food Waste Valorisation networks.
Jim Crilly
Strategic Science Group, Unilever R&D Jim Crilly, Senior Vice President of the Strategic Science Group (SSG) Unilever R&D, Responsible for the management of the SSG groups on the four key sites (hubs) - Port Sunlight, Colworth, Vlaardingen and Bangalore with a satellite group in Shanghai. He is the Vice President for Physical Science and leads the strategic development of the global science grid as well as Digital R&D. Jim is a senior member of the R&D Leadership Team since 2008, reporting to the Chief Science Officer. He was appointed Senior Vice President, Strategic Science Group at the end of December 2012. In this role he heads up the team of the leading scientists in the company, linking with leading academic institutes and universities across world to develop the global science grid for long term breakthrough innovation. Additionally, on behalf of R&D leadership he is held responsible for the quality of science and development of the Discover expertise right across the Unilever science base. Finally, he is the R&D leadership sponsor for Digital R&D and the champion for Unilever Sustainable Living Plan and, more recently, communications. Externally, Jim is a member of the UK Chief Scientist's Food Research Panel and he is Honorary Professor of Innovation in Food Science at the University of Nottingham. He served in a number of industry bodies throughout his career including the UK's FDF and CIAA across Europe and he was the vice Chairman of EUROGLACE, the European Ice Cream industry association. Previously, he was a leading member of the Creativity and Innovation special interest group of the UK's Inter Company Productivity Group (ICPG). Jim holds a Bachelor of Science (Honours) Degree in Pure and Applied Physics from his native Queen's University of Belfast and a PhD in Biophysics from the same institution. He has published widely on a number of research fields throughout his early career. He is a Chartered Physicist and Member of the Institute of Physics.
Buxing Han
Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China Email: Hanbx@iccas.ac.cn Professor Buxing Han received Ph.D. degree at Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) in 1988, and did postdoctoral research from 1989 to 1991 at the University of Saskatchewan, Canada. He has been a professor at Institute of Chemistry, His research interests include physicochemical properties of green solvent systems and applications of green solvents in green chemistry. He has published more than 500 papers in peer-reviewed scientific journals, such as Science, Acc. Chem. Res., Nat. Commun., Angew. Chem. Int. Ed., J. Am. Chem. Soc., Chem. Eur. J., Chem. Commun., Green Chem., ChemSunChem, J. Phys. Chem. B, Langmuir, and has presented more than 100 plenary or invited lectures at different conferences. The published papers have been cited more than 16000 times. He is an elected Academician of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Fellow of Royal Society of Chemistry, Titular Member of Division III, IUPAC, Chairman of the Chemical Thermodynamics and Thermal Analysis Committee, Chinese Chemical Society, and is the former Chairman of IUPAC Subcommittee on Green Chemistry. He is serving more than 10 peer-reviewed scientific journals such as Chem. Sci., Green Chem., ChemSusChem, J. Supercritical Fluids.
Yongmei Li
Tongji University, China Professor Yongmei Li, got her PhD in Tongji University in 1999, and became a faculty member in Tongji University in the same year. She worked as a postdoc researcher in Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Stanford University, USA in 2006-2007. Right now she is the chair of the Department of Environmental Engineering, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, China. Her research interests are in wastewater treatment and resource recycling, especially in emerging organic micropollutants removal in water and wastewater treatment processes, nutrient and carbon resource recycling, and the relative process modeling. So far, she has been in charge of many important research projects funded by the Natural Science Foundation of China, the Ministry of Science and Technology of China, the Ministry of Environmental Protection of China, the Ministry of Education of the China, etc. She has published more than 100 papers including 50 SCI papers. She was recognized by Educational Commission of Shanghai Municipality as excellent young faculty in Universities of Shanghai in 2003 and 2008, respectively, and was selected into China Excellent Talent Supporting Program sponsored by the Ministry of Education of China in 2008.
Weihua Song
Fudan University, China Dr. Weihua Song is currently a Professor of Department of Environmental Science and Engineering at Fudan University. He received a B.S. in Environmental Chemistry and M.S. in Environmental Engineering from Nanjing University in 1999 and 2002. He completed his Ph.D. with Professor Kevin E. O'Shea at Florida International University in 2006. He was a postdoctoral fellow, working with Prof. William J. Cooper at University of California, Irvine. His research interests are in the area of Environmental Chemistry. Particularly, he focuses on the photochemical fate of emerging contaminates in the aqueous environments. Other topics are advanced oxidation processes for the removal of these contaminates from drinking water, wastewater and water in reuse purpose.
Future of wastewater treatment with a focus on hazardous chemicals
Cranfield University, UK Due to the increasingly stringent regulations and wider ranging legislation relating to water and the environment the drive now is to determine appropriate control measures which can include the removal of hazardous chemicals during wastewater treatment. Secondary wastewater treatment as currently configured is not designed to remove hazardous chemicals, although they do so fortuitously. Enhancing the removal of hazardous chemicals by these existing wastewater treatment infrastructures is highly desirable due to the high potential capital costs required for the construction of alternative/additional treatment technologies. Activated sludge is a widely implemented existing treatment process offering a relatively sustainable approach with lower consumable outputs. Operational parameters which are modifiable and impact hazardous chemical removal include solids retention time (SRT) and hydraulic retention time (HRT). Producing a strategy which could optimise the removal of hazardous chemicals by activated sludge needs to encompass a chemically diverse range of hazardous chemicals encountered in wastewaters; ranging from conservatively biodegradable organics to non-biodegradable inorganic species. Such a wide variety of organic and inorganic chemicals offer extremities in physico-chemical properties. This causes their fate and behaviour to vary significantly during wastewater treatment making optimisation of their simultaneous removal difficult. The presentation will examine control measures for hazardous chemicals including their removal in wastewater treatment processes and future wastewater treatment flowsheets. Evolution of biomass burning smoke particles in the dark
Chunlin Li,† Zhen Ma,† Jianmin Chen,† Xinming Wang,‡ Xingnan Ye,† Lin Wang,† Xin Yang,† Haidong Kan,† D. J. Donaldson,*,§ Abdelwahid Mellouki□ †Shanghai Key Laboratory of Atmospheric Particle Pollution and Prevention (LAP3), Fudan Tyndall Center, Department of Environmental Science & Engineering, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433, China ‡State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Guangzhou 510640, China §Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto, 80 St. George Street, Toronto, Ont., M5S 3H6, Canada Institut de Combustion, Aérothermique, Réactivité et Environnement, CNRS, 45071 Orléans cedex 02, France The evolution in the dark of physiochemical properties and chemical composition of smoke particles emitted from wheat straw burning, as well as the effect of relative humidity (RH) on these properties, was investigated in an aerosol chamber. The smoke particles are composed primarily of carbonaceous materials and a considerable amount of inorganic salts ( 25 wt. %). During aging, the fraction of inorganic salts in smoke PM increases, mainly due to the formation of more sulfate and nitrate at the expense of chloride; this heterogeneous conversion is of fresh smoke particles is 0.27 and this is estimated to decrease by 0.01 after 4 h dark aging. Both aging and high RH lead to increases of particle size and density. The effective densities of smoke PM and PM deduced from concurrent mass and volume concentration measurements gradually increase from about 1.18 to 1.44 g/m3 within 4 h aging at 45%–55% RH, in line with the results obtained both from size-resolved particle density analysis using an aerosol particle mass analyzer (APM) and from estimation using composition-weighted bulk densities. The density of smoke particle is size-, RH-, and aging extent-dependent; the size effect becomes less pronounced Keywords
Smoke particle; aerosol chamber; dark aging; RH effect; effective density; hygroscopicity
Towards a circular economy using green chemistry
Green Chemistry Centre of Excellence, University of York, UK Increasing demand for consumer goods from an increasing world population is placing enormous strain on the resources needed by the worlds manufacturing industries. Traditional resources have often been from non- renewable sources located in relatively accessible regions but these are finite, their exploitation non-sustainable and they are becoming scarce. At the same time, the wastes generated in manufacturing and in use of the articles of today's society have been allowed to accumulate in rapidly filling landfill sites or disposed of in other environmentally harmful ways. The Circular Economy seeks a closed loop approach to the twin problems of resource and waste by making the latter the solution to the former – waste is the future resource. The most interesting of the large volume wastes is bio-wastes including forestry and agricultural by-products, and food supply chain wastage. To fully exploit the concept and make it widely useful while maintaining environmental advantage, we need to use Green Chemistry. New, energy efficient conversion technologies that can convert a wide variety of waste streams into valuable chemicals and energy include low-temperature microwave processing, benign solvent extraction and the use of mesoporous solids to capture metals from waste streams (including via the use of plants to help concentrate the metals). The integration of thermo-chemical and bio-chemical technologies will become increasingly important as we seek to increase the efficiency of biomass conversion.
A wide range of projects will be described to help illustrate how we can apply green chemical technologies to the valorisation of wastes. These projects are usually carried out in consortia often involving industry and on many occasions ranging across more than one country. Our COST Action of Food Waste Valorisation (http:// costeubis.org) is a good example of how we can draw together a diverse range of skills and disciplines to help tackle common challenges such as food waste and diminishing traditional resources. Our new international green chemistry centres network (http://g2c2.greenchemistrynetwork.org) helps create multinational partnerships that can meet new opportunities for tackling global challenges. References
1. Clark, J.H. et al, Food waste as a valuable resource for the production of chemicals, materials, and fuels. General situation
and global perspective, Energy and Environmental Science, 2013, 426-464; 2. Clark, J.H. (2015). The potential of microwave technology for the recovery, synthesis and manufacturing of chemicals from bio-wastes. Catalysis Today, 239, 80-89; SUSTAINABILITY: Big challenges for science and technology
VP Strategic Science Group, Unilever plc. This contribution presents an overview of Unilever as one of the foremost global multinational companies in the fast moving consumer goods (FMCG) sector which has tied a growth strategy for its business to a corporate commitment to sustainability. It outlines Unilever's essential credentials for sustainability showing how through its history and with the core values of the company it sets a new norm for responsible enterprises. Unilever's programme for addressing sustainability is embedded in the Unilever Sustainable Living Plan –a comprehensive action-plan to reduce its environmental imprint and to increase its positive social impact enabling a responsible and thriving business. Insights are delivered on the key problems which are faced not only by major companies like Unilever but by many companies, governments, countries and the entire human race resulting from an increasing global population, increased demand for energy ,water and food supply all against a backdrop of serious climate change. All of these factors will conspire in the future to push beyond the planetary boundaries for available resources and need practicable and innovative thinking to bring solutions for water shortages- not just for potable water but for washing, essential for health and hygiene. We need to address the mounting problem of waste-leftover or by product materials the quantity of which scales with global population growth and consumerism and to tackle the increasing threat to the quality of the very air we breathe due to pollution arising from ever expanding industrialisation and population growth. Within these BIG problem domains there are focal points for the FMCG industries to address for which solutions are only possible through the power of new science and technology. This expose sets the scene for the chosen theme of this year's entire Unilever-RSC symposium.
Properties of green solvents and their application in green chemistry
Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China Green chemistry is very important for the sustainable development of our society, which has received extensive attention. In this lecture I will give a brief introduction about green chemistry in China. At the same time, I would also like to discuss some recent works in our group on properties of green solvents and their application in green chemistry1-17, which include mainly: 1) phase behavior and intermolecular molecular interaction in complex supercritical fluids (SCFs), ionic liquids(ILs), CO /IL, CO /water, IL/water systems; 2) chemical reactions and material synthesis in green solvent systems. References
1. J. Y. Hu, J. Ma, B. X. Han, et al., Angew. Chem. Int. Ed., 2015, 18, 5399-5403.
2. J. L. Song, B. X. Han, et al., Angew. Chem. Int. Ed., 2015, DOI: 10.1002/anie.201504001.
3. X. C. Kang, W. T. Shang, T. Jiang, B. X. Han, et al., Chem. Sci., 2015, 6, 1668.
4. Q. L. Qian, B. X. Han, et al., Chem. Sci., 2015, DOI: 10.1039/c5sc02000j. 5. Y. Y. Yang, H. L. Fan, B. X. Han, et al., Chem. Commun., 2015, 51, 4028.
6. L. Peng, J. L. Zhang, S. L. Yang, B. X. Han, et al., Chem. Commun., 2015, 51, 4398.
7. C. Y. Wu, Z. F. Zhang, B. X. Han, et al., Green Chem., 2015, 17, 1467.
8. Z. F. Zhang, C. Y. Wu, J. Ma, J. L. Song, B. X. Han, et al., Green Chem., 2015, 17, 1633.
9. J. L. Song, L. Q. Wu, B. X. Han, et al., Green Chem., 2015, 17, 1626.
10. J. Y. Hu, J. Ma, B. X. Han, et al., Green Chem., 2015, 17, 1219.
11. X. C. Kang, J. L. Zhang, B. X. Han, et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2014, 136, 3768.
12. L. Peng, J. L. Zhang, Z. M. Xue, B. X. Han, et al., Nat. Commun., 2014, 5, 5465.
13. B. B. Zhang, J. L. Song, B. X. Han, et al., Chem. Sci., 2014, 5, 4656.
14. L. Peng, J. L. Zhang, B. X. Han, et al., Chem. Commun., 2014, 50, 11957.
15. C. C. Liu, J. L. Zhang, B. X. Han, et al., Chem. Commun., 2014, 50, 14233.
16. B. B. Zhang, J. L. Song, B. X. Han, et al., Green Chem., 2014, 16, 1198.
17. J. L. Zhang, B. X. Han, Acc. Chem. Res., 2013, 46, 425.
Sustainable wastewater treatment in China: Challenges,
opportunities and emerging technologies
Yongmei Li, Ai Zhang, Jie Wang, Qian Ping, Jinte Zou State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resources Reuse, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Tongji University, Siping Road 1239, Shanghai, China 200092 Corresponding author: Yongmei Li Wastewater is no longer a waste, but a kind of resource, such as water resource, carbon source and nutrient source. Nowadays, sustainable wastewater treatment is the choice in the world. The purpose of this study is to introduce the present situation and prospect of wastewater treatment in China. First, water pollution problems and the general wastewater treatment in China are reviewed. Second, challenges and opportunities of China are discussed based on the requirement of sustainable wastewater treatment. Finally, some emerging technologies for wastewater treatment and resource recovery are introduced. Strategies are also suggested for the development of wastewater treatment in China.
Keywords
Sustainable wastewater treatment, water pollution, contaminant removal, resource recovery, emerging technology
Development of surrogates to predict photochemical fate of PPCPs
in effluents
Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Fudan University, China The photochemical fate of PPCPs in the aqueous environments is an emerging concern for environmental scientists and engineers. The effluent from wastewater treatment plants is the major point source for PPCPs and its releases with EfOM together. In the current study, photo-degradation of twenty-three PPCPs was examined in the effluents under solar simulated irradiation. Radical scavenger, nitrogen saturated, isotopic effects experiments have been employed to elucidate the degradation mechanisms. Direct photo-degradation, 3EfOM* and hydroxyl radical are three major involved removal processes. With photo-degradation of trace levels of PPCPs, UV-vis and excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy of the effluents, also gradually reduced. Therefore, both water parameters have been identified as appropriate surrogates to assess the photo-degradation rates of PPCPs. Tyrosine-like EEM peak is associated with OH radical dominated PPPCs, such as trimethoprim, caffeine, ibuprofen, gemfibrozil, triclocarban, atenolol; UV, tryptophan-like peak and UV-humic-like peak are three parameters associated with 3EfOM* dominated PPCPs, including sulfamethoxazole, amoxicillin, roxithromycin, metoprolol, propranolol, carbamazepine, naproxen, ractopamine; Visible humic-like peak is associated with direct photodegradation dominated PPCPs, including metronidazole, ornidazole, dimetridazole, famotidine cimetidine. The decrease in the UV and EEM fluorescence correlated well with the removal of PPCPs. These results suggested that these water spectroscopies may be suitable surrogates for monitoring the photo-degradation of PPCPs in effluents. discount on all books for Royal Society of Chemistry members Choose from over 1,000 high-quality interdisciplinary, professional, expert books that detail the latest research advances and highlight technology, reference information, opinions and perspectives in modern science.
This book provides an interdisciplinary review of one of the great unsolved mysteries Histological Techniques Nanoscopic Materials Around the World that has fascinated scientists for over 150 years: the origin of chirality in biomolecules. Many theories have been put forward, some of them resting on solid ground, but all Albert Guijarro and Miguel Yus Chemistry of the An Introduction for Cosmic–Chemicahl andedness of molecules in the biosphere arose by chance. Others rely on discovering life on similar planets and making comparisons with Earth. Alternative theories have emerged from a range of backgrounds including geology, biology, chemistry, physics The Origin of Chirality Phenomena and Growth chemistry and high-energy physics may help to provide an answer. in the Molecules of Life Important pieces of information will come from observations at the two frontiers of A Revision from Awareness to the Current Theories science: outer space and the subatomic world. Observation of distant planets, galaxies, Robert Maynard, Noel Downes and even actual sampling of celestial objects from beyond the solar system are projects and Perspectives for this Unsolved Problem and Brenda Finney Katharina Lodders and Bruce Fegley, Jr.
duner try from the currently underway. At the other end of the spectrum, there are experiments that will study the elemental properties of matter, such as symmetry, and interactions with the Big Bang to Planet FormT
Chirality in the Molecules of Life: A Revision from Awareness to the
ries and Perspectives for this Unsolved Problem
of the origin of biomolecular homochirality together in one source. The various chapters DA Wil iams and TW Hartquist
This complete, interdisciplinary review of an intriguing subject condenses a large and book's strengths is its extensive use of graphic material to aid understanding the many subjects covered. It is fundamental, comprehensive and structured to be accessible for Front cover image courtesy of ESA (European Space Agency, Rosetta Program).
ISBN 978-0-85404-156-5 Registered charity number: 207890 051325 - RSC Members Discount Books 35.indd 1 2/28/2014 11:33:29 AM







Volume 17 Number 6 June 2015 Pages 3179–3654 Cutting-edge research for a greener sustainable futurewww.rsc.org/greenchem PAPER Erik V. Van der Eycken et al.
Supported gold nanoparticles as effi cient and reusable heterogeneous catalyst for cycloisomerization reactions As one of the world's leading academic publishers, we produce more than 35 peer-reviewed journals and Volume 1 Number 1 Month 20xx Pages 1–000 two magazines, and have over 1,000 books covering Water Research & Technology everything from medicinal chemistry to nanoscience.
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Source: http://environment.fudan.edu.cn/userfiles/files/RSC%20%26%20Unilever%20symposium_REVISED%20PROOF.PDF

Chapter 10: supportive care

CHAPTER 10: SUPPORTIVE CARE Lung cancer and its treatment can cause many symptoms that may interfere with your ability to live as you normally would. Health care providers often refer to this interference as a reduction in quality of life or QOL. Supportive care is a term that refers to treatments used to eliminate or reduce symptoms that interfere with your quality of life. The aim of supportive care is to provide you with the best quality of life possible, so that you are able to participate

foodimmunology.or.kr

Epinephrine: The Drug of Choice for AnaphylaxisVA Statement of the World Allergy Organization Stephen F. Kemp, Richard F. Lockey, F. Estelle R. Simons, on behalf of the World Allergy Organization ad hoc Committee on Epinephrine in Anaphylaxis Few controlled clinical trials, and no placebo-controlled Abstract: Anaphylaxis is an acute and potentially lethal multisystem