Marys Medicine

In second place among basic reasons for erectile dysfunction in Australia are different ailments buy viagra australia which may not necessarily be connected to the sexual sphere.

Adecco.mu


05 Executive Summary The Use of Social Media for Job Search Purposes The Effectiveness of Social Media in the Matching of Job Seekers with Open Positions in the Labor Market Web Reputation and its Impacts on Job Search The Social Capital of Individual Job Seekers Job Seekers' Profiles Statistical Appendix The Use of Social Media for Professional Purposes The Effectiveness of Social Media in the Matching of Job Seekers with Open Positions in the Labor Market The Relevance of Web Reputation and its Impact on Recruiting Training Undertaken for the Professional Use of Social Media Statistical Appendix 63 Authors and Contact Info Social media is and will increasingly become the new job marketplace in the
5 out of 10 job seekers use social media
future. The impact and best practices for job search purposes and 7 out of 10
however, are not always clear to all of the recruiters use social media for their daily
players involved, the job seekers and the HR activities.
When it comes to profile scouting and Adecco, the global leader in HR solutions, checking the accuracy of CV information, has published the most comprehensive social media is used more often than global study ever compiled on the use of
traditional search engines. social media in recruiting and job search,
29% of job seekers have been contacted
providing expert's advice to successfully through social media by a recruiter at
log onto the job market. least once, and 9% received a job offer.
We have gathered the answers of over
Surprisingly, the majority of profiles
17,000 job seekers and more than 1,500
searched for via social media are non-
recruiters from 24 countries and
managerial ones, showing that social
developed the study in partnership with recruiting is broader than normally the Catholic University of Milan, Italy. On the other hand, the factor that most The study mainly covers: the use of social affects the attitudes towards the use of media for professional purposes, the social media for job search is the effectiveness of social media in the educational qualification, with graduates matching of job seekers with open significantly more active than non- positions in the job market, and the graduates. Gender also emerges as a relevance of web reputation and its marker of difference, with women impact on recruiting. reported to be the most active. In 2013, more than half of all
Recruiters largely use social media to
recruitment activity involved the
assess a candidate's reputation: The use
Internet (53%), with the percentage for
of LinkedIn remains predominant (68%), 2014 forecasted to continue to grow
but Facebook is also relevant (52%), (61%). Social media is the digital tool
although this is generally regarded as a which is expected to experience the more personal social networking site. greatest increase in usage rates in 2014 by the recruitment sector. On the other hand, the research shows
that the vast majority of job seekers is
not aware of the professional relevance
Job seekers claim they use Facebook
of their personal social networks, and
more as a personal channel dedicated to
assumes their profile is only viewed and friends than as a channel aimed at accessed by their friends. Recruiters creating and maintaining professional believe that the most attractive element in a potential candidate's profile is the The relationships a candidate has have a
previous professional experience, direct impact in the recruiting process:
followed by professional prizes or awards, those who have a richer online network
often overlooked by the candidates. are not only more likely to use social
Personality insights that emerge from the media for their job search but most
profile come third, while no interest is importantly they get better results in
shown for the candidates' number of terms of contacts with recruiters and
contacts. Recruiters seem to distrust the
hirings.
number of contacts as a sort of "noisy"
information
that does not provide
trustworthy elements for professional Social media profiles of companies are largely perceived to be informative
"dashboards" more than a relationship
Approximately one third of recruiters
forming channel. Candidates consider
admit that they have rejected a potential
that the most attractive elements in a candidate as a consequence of the
company's profile are the presence of information, the pictures, or the content
jobs ads, followed by information about posted on the candidate's profile.
the company, and finally by the content Among the various elements which posted by the company. In both negatively influence the assessment of audiences, the relationship dimension of the web reputation of a candidate, social media and the related recruiters pay particular attention to the opportunities are widely underestimated. comments posted, particularly when they point to participation in activities which Among HR professionals who use social may violate University or workplace media for recruitment purposes, approximately 30% have attended
training courses
organized by their
Job Seekers largely state that they do not company (61% of HR respondents either post sensitive comments or pictures, did not receive guidelines for the use of showing that they are often not aware of social media or were unaware that these the impact of their communication guidelines existed). choices on the Web. Recruiting is increasingly social. To impact on job search, and the social understand how job seekers search for capital of individual job seekers. It is jobs on social media, which tools they use interesting to analyse this data, and how they present themselves online, keeping an eye on the Recruiters' Adecco conducted an in-depth study. responses to understand how they Between March 18th and June 2nd 2014, explore Web 2.0 when looking for a the survey gathered responses from candidate. In addition to the global 17,272 candidates (8,992 complete data, the report compares the five responses and 8,280 partial areas taken into consideration2: APAC, responses1) from 24 countries. We also Eastern Europe and MENA, Western interviewed 1,501 recruiters to Europe, Southern Europe and the US. discover how companies use social The report also includes a statistical media in the recruitment process. appendix, which offers further detail The sample presents a substantially on the responses provided by the balanced distribution with a majority of males (52%), born after 1981 (46%), and mostly graduates (43%). Those 1 The total numbers reported in the tables and who are employed mostly hold non- figures also include the partial responses, which managerial positions (59%). lack information on their socio-demographic profiles. This report, which has been compiled 2 APAC includes Australia and Singapore. Eastern in partnership with the Catholic Europe and MENA include: Bulgaria, Czech University in Milan, covers four areas: Republic, Greece, Croatia, Hungary, Morocco, the use of social media for job search Poland, Romania, Russia, Slovenia, Slovakia, Turkey, Tunisia, Arab Emirates, and Ukraine. purposes, the effectiveness of social Western Europe includes: the Netherlands, media in matching job seekers with Switzerland, and the United Kingdom. Southern open positions, web reputation and its Europe includes: Spain, France, and Italy. And finally the USA. The data shows that 55% of Job Seekers use social media for job search purposes (among Recruiters, the percentage of use for HR professional purposes was around 73%). In this regard, LinkedIn is largely the most used social networking site (35%) followed by Facebook (17%) (fig. 1). Fig. 1 – Social Media Used in General and for Job Search.
% Value. Total Survey, 2014.
Notes: (1) General use also includes job search usage. (2) Total Social Media is the percentage of respondents using at least one of the considered social media platforms. The differences that emerge among the various geographic areas are quite significant. A peak use of social media platforms for job search can be found in Western Europe (63%), whilst APAC and Eastern Europe/MENA report lower rates of use (fig. 2). Fig. 2 – Social Media Used in General and For Job Search Purposes by Region.
% Value. Total Survey, 2014.
Use for job search The element that seems to most affect the attitudes towards the use of social media for job search is the educational qualification, with graduates being significantly more active than non-graduates. Gender also emerges as a marker of difference, with women reported to be more active. Age hardly seems to be relevant, although it should be noted that it is a factor that has more of an effect on whether the candidate has access to social media (tab.1). Tab. 1 - Social Media Used in General and for Job Search by Socio-demographic Profile.
% Value. Total Survey, 2014.
Notes: (1) Total number also includes cases that have not provided information about their socio-demographic profile. (2) The analysis of respondents born before 1946 (over 68 years old) has been omitted due to the limited sample size (28 respondents). Use for job
General Use
Year of birth
1946-1964
1965-1980
After 1981
Level of education completed
Less than High School

High School
Master or Doctoral Degree
Based upon employment status, the use of social media for job search appears to be significantly higher among those who are searching for their first job (74%), as well as among those who are temporarily redundant (67%) (tab. 2). Tab. 2 – Use of Social Media for Job Search by Employment Status.
% Value. Total Survey, 2014.
Note: Total value also includes cases that have not provided information about their employment status. Employment status
Use for job search
Employed
Unemployed and looking for work
Temporarily redundant
Looking for my first job
Among Job Seekers, the most frequent activities when searching for jobs online appear to be the most "traditional" ones, for instance, searching through job ads (63%) or for potential hirers (55%) (tab. 3). Women also do less personal branding than men, but seem to pay more attention to what others say about a potential employer. Younger workers seem to be more active with the more "relational" search practices, as reported in the "importance of personal branding", "professional networking", and "reputation analysis of potential hirers" sections of the analysis. Those who are already employed are generally more active online than people out of work, especially in the most innovative practices. The only activity that is performed less is submitting applications, a result which can be attributed to the fear of being exposed by their current employer, coupled with the minor urgency of finding new employment. Tab. 3 - Use of Social Media for Specific Job Search Activities.
% Value. Total Survey, 2014.
Notes: (1) The analysis of seekers born before 1946 (over 68 years old) has been omitted due to the limited sample size (28 respondents). (2) Multiple choice question. Check what
Researching
other say
Personal
Searching
Submitting
potential
branding
networking
employers'
potential
employers
Year of birth
1946-1964
1965-1980
After 1981
Level of education completed
Less than High School
High School
Master or Doctoral Degree
Principal employment status
Employed
Unemployed and looking for
A reported 49% of job seekers use social media to distribute their CV online. 29% of job seekers were contacted through social media by a recruiter at least once, and 9% received a job offer. The geographic area where candidates and recruiters are more active across social media and where the best results can be seen in terms of matching is Western Europe (fig. 3). Fig. 3 - Steps Taken To Get a Job by Region.
% Value. Total Survey, 2014.
38.4 29.0
Contacted by a recruiter Eastern Europe and MENA No significant differences emerge in terms of gender, except for a slightly higher rate of men who have been contacted by a recruiter. The use of social media to distribute CVs is more frequently seen among those aged 50 and over and among those with a postgraduate degree (who are also those contacted most often). However, the younger candidates who are contacted by recruiters have the highest chances of being offered a job. People who already have a job present the same proactive attitude in terms of online job search activity when compared to people currently out of work, but generally obtain better results (tab. 4). Tab. 4 – Steps Taken to Get a Job by Socio-demographic Characteristics.
% Value. Total Survey, 2014.
Note: The analysis of job seekers born before 1946 (over 68 years old) has been omitted due to the limited sample size (28 respondents). Contacted by a
Get the job
recruiter
Year of birth
1946-1964
1965-1980
After 1981
Highest level of education completed
Less than High School
High School
Master or Doctoral Degree
Principal employment status
Employed
Unemployed and looking for work
LinkedIn is considered without a doubt to be the most effective social networking site in terms of matching Job Seekers with open positions. The effectiveness index of LinkedIn is 0.13 (the index assumes values between -1, lowest effectiveness, and 1, highest effectiveness). Among the others, Facebook rates at -0.29 and therefore, is considered to be a "less ineffective" social networking site (fig. 4). These rates are considerably lower than those gathered among recruiters, where LinkedIn is rated at 0.60 and Facebook is positively assessed (0.05). Fig. 4 - Effectiveness Index of Social Media for Recruitment Purposes.
Total Survey, 2014.
Note: Index value from -1 (max ineffectiveness) to 1 (max effectiveness), value 0 if neutral position. The countries where LinkedIn is perceived to be less effective are also those where candidates are less active (Southern Europe). This is significantly different from the trends shown in the Recruiters' report, where LinkedIn is reported to be less effective in Western Europe. (fig. 5). Fig. 5 - Effectiveness Index of LinkedIn for Recruitment Purposes by Region.
Total Survey, 2014.
Note: Index value from -1 (max ineffectiveness) to 1 (max effectiveness), value 0 if neutral position. In terms of demographics, the Job Seekers who use LinkedIn most often are women and young professionals. (fig. 6) Fig. 6 - Effectiveness Index of LinkedIn for Recruiting Purposes by Gender and by Year of Birth.
Total Survey, 2014.
Notes: (1) Index value from -1 (max ineffectiveness) to 1 (max effectiveness), value 0 if neutral position. (2) The analysis of job seekers born before 1946 (over 68 years old) has been omitted due to the limited sample size (28 respondents). The relationship between social media use and Job Seekers' educational qualifications seems to be quite evident. The increase in the perceived utility of social media is directly proportional to the increase in the level of education. The effectiveness index for postgraduates generates a rate of 0.47. Those in employment consider these tools to be more effective (0.32) when compared to those out of work (0.02), who are more inclined to be distrustful of LinkedIn's effectiveness (fig. 7). Fig. 7 - Effectiveness Index of LinkedIn for Recruitment Purposes by Highest Level of Education Completed
and by Principal Employment Status.
Total Survey, 2014.
Note: Index value from -1 (max ineffectiveness) to 1 (max effectiveness), value 0 if neutral position. Job Seekers seem to consider the presence of job ads to be the most attractive elements on the companies' social media profiles (attractiveness index of 0.50), followed by the presence of general information about the company (0.41), and finally by the content posted by the company (0.32). Social media profiles run by companies are largely perceived to be informational "dashboards" more than a relationship forming channel (tab. 5). Tab. 5 – Attractiveness Index of the Company's Social Media Page.
Total Survey, 2014.
Note: Index value from -1 (min attractiveness) to 1 (max attractiveness). Rank Elements on company's Social Media profile
Job Postings (and ability to search for jobs)
General company information (e.g. about, contact.)
Content posted by the company
Company's interaction with users
Recommendation on this company by relatives or contacts
Comments posted by other users
Firm popularity (likes, reviews.)
Pictures
Number of followers (e.g. fans, group members.)
Job seekers claim they use Facebook more as a personal channel dedicated to friends than as a channel aimed at creating and maintaining professional relationships (tab. 6). Tab. 6 - Index of Agreement with Specific Statements Regarding a Candidate's Private
and Professional Image on Facebook.
Total Survey, 2014.
Note: Index value from -1 (max disagreement) to 1 (max agreement), value 0 if neutral position. Statements about privacy
I assume my profile is only viewed by my friends
My profile can only be accessed by my friends
It is important to maintain a professional image online
My online image is important to my future
I work hard to maintain a professional image on my profile
The element most often present in the Job Seekers' web profiles is the information related to their previous professional experiences (index of attendance of 0.33). This is also the type of information that recruiters pay most attention to. Personal information is also present (0.30), whilst reputational information is significantly less present, along with references and comments posted by others (-0.13). It is interesting to note that professional awards and prizes, which recruiters place considerable importance on, are largely overlooked by Job Seekers (tab. 7). Tab. 7 – Career Related Information Contained in Social Media Profile: Index of Attendance.
Total Survey, 2014.
Note: Index value from -1 (fully absent element) to 1 (very attendant element). Rank Elements on Social Media profile
Professional experience
Personal information (marital status, gender.)
Personality emerging from profile
Number of contacts
Hobbies and personal interests
Pictures
Content posted
Professional prizes and awards
References and comments posted by others
Concerning the elements which may negatively affect the web reputation of a Job Seeker, it can be observed that these all have a relatively low index of attendance (largely below 0). In particular, those elements that recruiters seem to pay particular attention to, such as comments related to the participation in activities that may be in violation of University or workplace policies, are hardly present (- 0.77), such as "selfies" or pictures containing sensitive or controversial content (-0.76). It is worth underlining that younger Job Seekers show a greater tendency to post "sensitive" content (tab. 8). Tab. 8 - Elements Posted on Social Media Profiles: Index of Attendance by Socio-demographic Characteristics.
Total Survey, 2014.
Notes: (1) Index value from -1 (very unlikely) to 1 (very likely). (2) The analysis of job seekers born before 1946 (over 68 years old) has been omitted due to the limited sample size (28 respondents). (3) Multiple choice question. Comments on
Informal selfie
Comments on
participation in
or tagged
selfie / tagged
controversial activities which are
photo (e.g.
photo (e.g.
topics (e.g.
in violation of
wearing a
drinking alcohol) illegal drugs)
university or
swimsuit)
workplace policy
Year of birth
1946-1964
1965-1980
After 1981
Level of education completed
Less than High School
High School
Master or Doctoral Degree
Principal employment status
Employed
Unemployed and looking for work

A number of research works have demonstrated how the most effective channel for the matching of Job Seekers with
open positions is word-of-mouth. Therefore, it is important not only to study the configuration of the personal social
networks of Job Seekers, but also the role played by social media to enforce or diversify these relationships and to
facilitate access to new information. To do so, we have used the "position generator", one of the tools that is widely
advocated throughout these studies, that makes it possible to estimate the "wealth" of the social capital of an
individual. This is done by first assessing professional figures that belong to their social network. A proportional
weight relating to the "prestige status" of the occupation, as it is commonly classified by professional class structure, is
then attributed to each of the professions. This makes it possible to rate social networks based upon their "wealth" in
social capital, namely weak (low social capital), medium, or rich (high social capital).
To refine the analysis, we have adopted also a slight variation, asking whether contact was more often based on offline, online, or multiple (both) interactions. From this question, we have been able to reconstruct the wealth created by the offline and online social capital of the individuals involved, and the most frequent relationship-based channels they use. The candidates' social networks appear to be made-up of a strong integration between both offline and online networks. The contacts entertained across both channels are prevalent (52% vs 37% only offline and 26% only online). Also, if we take into consideration only the contacts who fall into the category of high-status professionals, the proportion of offline to online contacts remains relatively unaltered (43% both online and offline vs 23% offline and 18% online) (fig. 8). Fig. 8 - Percentage of Seekers with Online, Offline, and/or both Network Contacts (in general or high status).
% Value. Total Survey, 2014.
Note: 4 (out of 12) professions are considered to be high status: policy maker, lawyer, director of a company, or engineer. Both online and offline % of cases with almost one profession in network % of cases with almost one high status profession in network 1 To differentiate between concepts, we talk about social media to refer to social platforms (Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter etc.) and social networks to refer to the relationships (online and offline) of the job seekers. In 69% of cases, contacts have maintained the same relationship strength across both channels (tab. 9). Tab. 9 - Strength of the Job Seeker's Online and Offline Networks.
Total Survey, 2014.
Note: the network was calculated by attributing the weight ISEI (International Classification for Professional Prestige) to each professional figure acknowledged by a job seeker and then dividing the distribution of the networks into weak, medium, and rich categories using the tertile observed for each respondent at an international level. Offline network
Online network
Those currently employed are generally Job Seekers with richer social networks and the difference is even greater when we factor in the online networks (tab. 10). Tab. 10 - Employment Status by Level of Offline and Online Networks.
% Value. Total Survey, 2014.
Online network
Offline network
Employment status
Weak Medium
Employed
Unemployed and looking for work
Also, the Job Seekers who possess a richer social network, especially online, present a higher skill level in the use of social media when compared to those with medium or weak social networks (tab. 11). Tab. 11 - Index of Expertise on Social Media by Level of Offline and Online Networks.
% Value. Total Survey, 2014.
Note: Index value from -1 (not at all confident) to 1 (very confident), value 0 if neutral position. Online network
Offline network
Task about expertise on Social Media
I can be very effective at using social media
I can have a positive impact on the lives of others
through social media
I can offer other people important and interesting

information by posting on social media
I can find important and interesting information

by reading other people's content on social media
I can use social media as an effective way of

connecting with others
I can communicate very effectively using social

Having a rich network seems to have direct implications on the effectiveness of the job search. The use of social media for job search and the possibility of being contacted by a recruiter are more common across such networks. The success in gaining employment seems to be higher for those who possess a rich online social network (tab. 12). Tab. 12 - Indicators Regarding the Use of Social Media by Level of Offline and Online Networks.
% Value. Total Survey, 2014.
Indicators about use of
Online network
Offline network
Social Media
Use of Social Media for job
searching
Distributing CV

Contacted by a recruiter
Get the job
If we look beyond the overall wealth of the social networks, and directly observe the capacity to reach people of higher status, the data shows a very interesting trend. Furthermore, if we isolate online relationships from offline relationships we can see geographical differences. In APAC and Southern European countries, contacts who solely maintained offline relationships may reach higher status positions, whilst in Eastern Europe, Western Europe, and the US, online contacts appeared to be more effective (fig. 9). Fig. 9 - Percentage of Job Seekers with High Status of Offline and Online Networks by Region.
% Value. Total Survey, 2014.
Online and offline Those who can access a "high social networking status" via online interactions are more inclined to use social media channels for their job search, are more frequently contacted by recruiters, and more often obtain better results in terms of employment offers (fig. 10). Fig. 10 - Indicators Regarding the Use of Social Media in Job Seekers with High Offline and Online Network Statuses.
% Value. Total Survey, 2014.
Contacted by a recruiter High status online network High status offline network High status online and offline network From this analysis a number of clusters can be formed (tab. 14): 1. A primary profile, which may be labelled as "the non-integrated cluster" pertains to most of the Job Seekers (71%) and presents educational qualifications, occupational levels, and professional statuses, which are comparatively lower than the other profiles. This combines with a lower average use of social media, particularly for professional purposes, and also fewer skills in their use. A hesitant attitude to post information about one's professional experience on social media and a greater attention to the publication of information which may affect or compromise a personal reputation is also apparent. Lastly, there seems to be a higher occupational status on the offline social networks. They receive the worst results in terms of online job search. 2. A second, intermediate profile, which may be called "the semi-integrated cluster", includes about 27% of Job Seekers who are on average younger, graduates with intermediate-level occupation and professional status, an intermediate use of social media, and an online network which is, on average, made of higher status professionals. They receive medium results in terms of online job search. 3. Finally, a small cluster (only 2% of Job Seekers), which may be called "the highly-integrated cluster", is comprised of "excellent", profiles with considerably higher skill levels and educational qualifications (largely postgraduates) with higher occupational levels and statuses, and a broader use of social media, especially for professional purposes. They possess greater skills in their use of social media and a positive attitude towards the online publication of professional experiences. When compared to other profiles they also hesitate to release information which may affect their web reputation. Lastly, a greater interrelationship exists between their offline and online networks, which are generally composed of higher status contacts. They achieve the best results in terms of online job search. Tab. 13 – Job Seekers' Profile: Value of Indicators About Social Media or About Socio-demographic Characteristics by
Cluster.
% Value. Total Survey, 2014.
The semi-
integrated
integrated
integrated
% of cases
Socio-demographic characteristics
% of female
% of Young (< 33 years)
% with College Degree or more
% with Master or Doctoral Degree
% of employed
% of unemployed and looking for work
% of middle manager or more (only for employed)
Indicators about use of Social Media
% that uses social media
% that uses LinkedIn for job search
Index of expertise on Social Media about answer "I can be
very effective at using social media"
% that has distributed CV

% of contacted by a recruiter through profile on a social
media platform
% who got the job
Indicators about network
% with high status online network
% with high offline network
% with high status online and offline network
Indicators about characteristic of profile on social media
Index of attendance of professional experience

information in social media profile
Index of attendance Controversial selfie or tagged photo

(e.g. drinking alcohol) on Facebook profile
Indicators about opinion on recruiting using social media

% that thinks that companies use social media to recruit
Note (1): Index of expertise on Social Media value from -1 (not at all confident) to 1 (very confident), value 0 if neutral position. (2) Indices of attendance value from -1 (fully absent element) to 1 (very attendant element). Tab 1.A - Generally speaking, which social networks do you use? Do you use them for job search?
Total Survey, 2014.
Yes, for job search Facebook
LinkedIn
Pinterest
Instagram
Tab 2.A - How often do you look for jobs on social media?
Total Survey, 2014.
Every day
Several times per week
At least once a week
At least once a month
Tab 3.A - Use of social networks for job search, activities?
Total Survey, 2014.
Personal branding
Distributing my CV
Professional networking
Searching for jobs
Submitting applications
Researching potential employers' pages
Check what other say about potential employers
Tab 4.A - From 1 to 5, how effective are these social networks for job search?
Total Survey, 2014.
(very effective) Facebook
LinkedIn
Pinterest
Instagram
Tab 5.A - From 1 to 5, what career-related information does your social media profile contain?
Total Survey, 2014.
Personal information (e.g. marital status, gender.)
Personality emerging from profile
Pictures
Professional experience
Number of contacts
Hobbies and personal interests
Professional prizes and awards
References and comments posted by others
Content posted
Tab 6.A - From 1 to 5, how likely are you to post the following items on your Facebook profile?
Total Survey, 2014.
Controversial selfie Comments on Comments on participation Informal selfie or in activities which are in tagged photo (e.g. violation of university or wearing a swimsuit) workplace policy
1 (very unlikely)
3 (neutral)
5 (very likely)
Tab 7.A - From 1 to 5, indicate to which extent you agree with the following statements
in regards to your Facebook profile.
Total Survey, 2014.
It is important to professional image 1 (I strongly disagree)
3(neutral)
5 (I strongly agree)
Tab 8.A - Have you ever been contacted by a recruiter through your profile on a social media platform?
Total Survey, 2014.
Tab 9.A - Did you get the job?
Total Survey, 2014.
Note: Statistic calculated only for "Yes" answers of Tab. 8.A. Tab 10.A - Do you think companies use social media to recruit?
Total Survey, 2014.
I don't know
Tab 11.A - From 1 to 5, how much do the following attract your attention on a company's social media page?
Total Survey, 2014.
General company information (e.g.
about, contact.)
Pictures

Number of followers (e.g. fans,
group members.)
Firm popularity (likes, reviews.)

Company's interaction with users
Content posted by the company
Comments posted by other users
Job Postings (and ability to search
for jobs)
Recommendation on this company

by relatives or contacts
Tab 12.A - From 1 to 7, please indicate how certain you are that you can perform each of the following tasks.
Total Survey, 2014.
I can offer other I can find important I can use social effective way of very effectively people's content on posting on social 1 (not at all confident)
4 (neutral)
7 (very confident)
Tab 13.A - Does your online or offline network include the following professions?
Total Survey, 2014.
Insurance agent
Book-keeper or accountant
Construction worker
Policy maker
Police officer
Unskilled labourer
Director of a company
Engineer
Estate or Real-estate agent
Tab 14.A - Gender.
Total Survey, 2014.
Tab 15.A - Year of birth.
Total Survey, 2014.
Before 1946
1946-1964
1965-1980
After 1981
Tab 16.A - What is the highest level of education you have completed?
Total Survey, 2014.
Less than High School
High School
Some College
2 or 3 year College Degree
4 or 5 year College Degree
Master or Doctoral Degree
Tab 17.A - Field of study.
Total Survey, 2014.
Education
Art and humanities
Social sciences, journalism and information
Business, administration and law
Natural sciences, mathematics and statistic
Information and Communication Technologies
Engineering, manufacturing and construction
Agriculture, forestry, fisheries and veterinary
Health and welfare
Services
Tab 18.A - How many years' work experience do you have?
Total Survey, 2014.
1 year or less
3-5 years
6-10 years
11-20 years
More than 20 years
Tab 19.A - Employment status.
Total Survey, 2014.
Employed
Unemployed and looking for work
Unemployed but not seeking work
Temporarily redundant
Looking for my first job
I have never worked and I'm not looking for a job
Tab 20.A - Business area.
Total Survey, 2014.
Note: Statistic calculated only for "employed" answers of Tab. 19.A. Chemicals
Basic Resources
Construction & Materials
Industrial Goods & Services
Automobiles & Parts
Food & Beverage
Personal & Household Goods
Health Care
Travel & Leisure
Utilities
Insurance
Real Estate
Financial Services
Technology
Tab 21.A - What is your position?
Total Survey, 2014.
Note: Statistic calculated only for "employed" answers of Tab. 19.A. Non manager
Middle manager
Senior manager and above
Tab 22.A - Which department do you work in?
Total Survey, 2014.
Note: Statistic calculated only for "employed" answers of Tab. 19.A. Controlling, Accounting & Finance
Purchasing
Research & Development
Information Technology
Logistics
Marketing
Corporate Communication & PR
Human Resources
Quality Management
Recruiting is increasingly social. To recruiting, and the training provided for understand how companies operate on the professional use of social media. It is social media, which tools they use, and interesting to analyse this data, keeping what they look for in the recruiting an eye on the candidates' responses in process, Adecco conducted an in-depth order to understand how they explore study. Between March 18th and June 2nd Web 2.0 when looking for a job. 2014, 1,501 recruiters from 24 countries In addition to the global data, the report took part in the online survey, resulting in compares the three geographic areas 873 complete responses and 628 partial taken into consideration: Eastern Europe responses1. We also collected responses and MENA , Western Europe and from more than 17,000 jobseekers to Southern Europe2. The USA and APAC, discover how they use social media for although considered in the overall figures, their job search. have not been analysed as individual The sample is mostly composed of areas due to the low number of responses females (66%), professionals born after (19 and 13 respectively). The report also 1981 (46%), graduates (76%) equally includes a statistical appendix, which distributed between those with more and offers further detail on the responses less than five years' experience, in a provided by the participants. managerial position (37%), in companies 1 The total numbers reported in the tables and with more than 250 employees (56%), figures also include the partial responses which and mostly recruiting agencies (51%). lack information about the companies' sector or This report, which has been compiled in partnership with the Catholic University 2 Eastern Europe and MENA include: Bulgaria, of Milan, Italy, covers four areas: the use Czech Republic, Greece, Croatia, Hungary, of social media for professional purposes, Morocco, Poland, Romania, Russia, Slovenia, Slovakia, Turkey, Tunisia, Arab Emirates, and the effectiveness of social media in the Ukraine. Western Europe includes: the matching of job seekers with open Netherlands, Switzerland and the United Kingdom. positions in the job market, the relevance Southern Europe includes: Spain, France, and Italy. of web reputation and its impact on 73% of respondents use at least one social networking site for professional purposes, meaning that they use their personal accounts for recruitment purposes. The most used platform is LinkedIn (58% of respondents), whilst the professional use of Facebook follows some way behind (28%). More than half of the companies where the respondents are currently employed have at least one active account on a social networking site, with an equal presence on LinkedIn and Facebook (53%). Relevant figures also emerge in relation to other social media platforms: Twitter (31%) and YouTube (18%) (fig. 1). Fig. 1 - Accounts on Social Media for Professional Use and Active Company Presence on Social Media.
% Value. Total Survey, 2014.
Note: Total Social Media is the percentage proportion of respondents using at least one of the considered social media platforms. Southern Europe emerges as the region experiencing the greatest delay in the use of social networking sites in the recruitment processes, particularly in relation to the individual recruiter (34% vs. a global average of 73%) (fig. 2). Fig. 2 - Accounts on Social Media for Professional Use and Active Company Presence on Social Media by Region.
% Value. Total Survey, 2014.
Eastern Europe and MENA Professional use by the recruiter Company's account Most of the companies active on social media are large sized companies (82% have at least 250 employees and a profile on at least one social networking site), followed by small-sized companies (between 10 and 50 employees, 69%) (fig. 3). Fig. 3 - Active Company Presence on Social Media by Company Size.
% Value. Total Survey, 2014.
Micro: < 10 people % by company size % in total companies The companies most present on social media, grouped by the sector in which they operate, are Recruiting Agencies, Telecommunications, Chemicals, Technology, and Media. (tab. 1). Tab. 1 - Active Company Presence on Social Media by Industry.
% Value. Total Survey, 2014.
Industry
Recruiting
Chemicals
Technology
Health Care
Travel & Leisure
Utilities
Financial Services
Food & Beverage
Insurance
Basic Resources
Automobiles & Parts
Construction & Materials
Industrial Goods & Services
Oil & Gas / Real Estate
Personal & Household Goods / Banks
In the majority of cases, the use of social media by recruiters is more often either voluntary (58%) or strongly recommended (37%), and only in rare cases is it mandatory (6%). The use of social media is more often mandatory in Eastern Europe and MENA (8%). Fig. 4 – Directives Regarding Recruiters' Use of Social Media by Region.
% Value. Total Survey, 2014.
Eastern Europe and Highly recommended The use of social media by recruiters is most often recommended or mandatory in large-sized companies. It is interesting to note, however, that if we limit the analysis to solely mandatory use, the companies where this occurs are mostly small-sized (11%) and medium-sized companies (8%) (fig. 5). Fig. 5 – Directives Regarding Recruiters' Use of Social Media by Company Size.
% Value. Total Survey, 2014.
Highly recommended The recruiters' use of social media is more often either strongly recommended or mandatory in the Recruiting sector (63% of cases), followed by the Telecommunications industry (55%) (tab. 2). Tab. 2 – Directives Regarding Recruiters' Use of Social Media by Industry:
% of "Highly Recommended or Mandatory".
% Value. Total Survey, 2014.
Business Area
Recruiting
Health Care
Technology
Oil & Gas / Real Estate
Basic Resources
Insurance
Travel & Leisure
Utilities / Food & Beverage
Financial Services
Industrial Goods & Services
Chemicals
Construction & Materials
Automobiles & Parts
Personal & Household Goods / Banks
More in depth, the most recurrent activities that are pursued through social media are job advertising (65%), followed by the active sourcing of passive candidates (60%), and checking the accuracy of CV information (53%) (tab. 3). Tab 3 - Use of Social Media for Specific Recruitment Activities.
% Value. Total Survey, 2014.
Note: multiple choice question. Recruiting activities:
Advertising jobs
Sourcing passive candidates
Checking the accuracy of an applicant's CV
Receiving job applications
Checking an applicant's network
Employer branding
Checking content posted by an applicant
Checking references of an applicant
Additionally, a surprising result emerged concerning the profiles of those professional figures that recruiters most often search for via social media. It can be said that these profiles are mostly non-managerial profiles. This clearly demonstrates that social recruiting is broader and encompasses different profiles from those normally expected and that for the most qualified profiles, recruiters tend to prefer traditional channels of information and face-to-face networking. The only exception appears to be Eastern Europe and MENA, where managerial professions are the most searched for profiles in the digital sphere (fig. 6). Fig. 6 - Typology of Candidate Profiles Searched For, Using Social Media by Region.
% Value. Total Survey, 2014.
Note: multiple choice question. 54.5 54.6
37.1 38.4
Eastern Europe and MENA Senior manager and above Managerial profiles are generally searched for using social media platforms by medium and large-sized companies (fig. 7). Fig. 7 - Typology of Candidate Profiles Searched For, Using Social Media by Company Size.
% Value. Total Survey, 2014.
Note: multiple choice question. 54.5 54.6
50.3 51.7
Micro: < 10 people Senior manager and above In 2013, more than half of all recruitment activity involved the Internet (web in general, not solely social media) (53%), with the percentage for 2014 expected to continue to grow (61%). However, Southern Europe remains the area where the adoption of digital resources occurs much later, and despite their intention to use them, it can reasonably be said that this gap will remain throughout 2014 (fig. 8). Fig. 8 - Percentage of Total Recruitment Activity Involving the Internet by Region.
% Value. Total Survey, 2014.
Eastern Europe and MENA % by region (2013) % by region (2014 forecast) % in total companies (2013) % in total companies (2014 forecast) Microbusinesses are less inclined to use digital resources as a personnel search method (45% of total recruiting activity), whilst these figures are highest among firms with 50+ employees (fig. 9). Fig. 9 - Percentage of Total Recruitment Activity Involving the Internet by Company Size.
% Value. Total Survey, 2014.
Micro: < 10 people % by company size % in total companies (2013) % in total companies (2014 forecast) By looking at the various sectors analysed, it emerges that companies operating in the Technology sector, have used the Internet more often as a recruitment tool (60% of the total recruiting activity), immediately followed by the Recruitment sector (fig. 10). Fig. 10 - Percentage of Total Recruitment Activity Involving the Internet by Business Area (first 4).
% Value. Total Survey, 2014.
Social media is the digital tool which is expected to experience the greatest increase in usage in 2014 by the Recruitment sector. Fig. 11 - Change in the Importance of Digital Tools by the Recruitment Sector in the Next Year.
Total Survey, 2014.
The social media platforms that are regarded as the most efficient in the recruitment process are LinkedIn and Facebook. The former is most often used with an "effectiveness index" of 0.60, whilst the latter remains at 0.05. The index indicates a value between -1, the lowest effectiveness, and 1, the highest effectiveness (fig. 12). These are significantly high figures when compared to those reported by Job Seekers, where the effectiveness index of LinkedIn is rated at a value of only 0.13. Fig. 12 - Effectiveness Index of Social Media for Recruitment Purposes.
Total Survey, 2014.
Note: Index value from -1 (max ineffectiveness) to 1 (max effectiveness), value 0 if neutral position. -0.55 -0.55 -0.55 -0.48 Focusing solely on LinkedIn, it emerges that the more often it is used, the more its perceived effectiveness increases, showing an increasing appreciation for the platform as a result of direct usage (fig. 13). Fig. 13 - Effectiveness Index of LinkedIn for Recruitment Purposes by Use.
Total Survey, 2014.
Note: Index value from -1 (max ineffectiveness) to 1 (max effectiveness), value 0 if neutral position. Yes, for personal This insight is confirmed by the fact that the perceived effectiveness of LinkedIn grows as the size of the business grows (fig.14) and LinkedIn appears to be appreciated most by those companies which use it most frequently (recruiting agencies) (tab. 4). Fig. 14 - Effectiveness Index of LinkedIn for Recruitment Purposes by Company Size.
Total Survey, 2014.
Note: Index value from -1 (max ineffectiveness) to 1 (max effectiveness), value 0 if neutral position. Tab. 4 - Effectiveness Index of LinkedIn for Recruitment Purposes by Industry (first 4).
Total Survey, 2014.
Note: Index value from -1 (max ineffectiveness) to 1 (max effectiveness), value 0 if neutral position. Industry
Recruiting
Industrial Goods & Services
Technology
Food & Beverage
There is, however, an interesting exception. In Western Europe, where the use of social media is greater than in Southern Europe, effectiveness is reported to be lower. Fig. 15 - Effectiveness Index of LinkedIn for Recruitment Purposes by Region.
Total Survey, 2014.
Note: Index value from -1 (max ineffectiveness) to 1 (max effectiveness), value 0 if neutral position. Western Europe Southern Europe The effectiveness of social media use is reported to be positive overall, with figures that are generally above the "positive threshold" of value 0, though without experiencing high peaks of "extremely positive" rates (the entry in point, "using social media increases my productivity" is reported at 0.18). However, there are many recruiters who intend to use these tools in the next 12 months. Also, there still seems to be a widespread need for training, since the entry "it is easy for me to master social media" is reported at 0.25. Tab. 5 - Index of Agreement with Specific Statements Regarding the Use of Social Media for Recruitment.
Total Survey, 2014.
Note: Index value from -1 (max disagreement) to 1 (max agreement), value 0 if neutral position. Statements
I intend to use social media in the next 12
I find social media useful in my job
I have the knowledge necessary to use
social media
I have the resources necessary to use social

It is easy for me to master social media
In general, my company supports the use of
social media
Using social media increases my

productivity
People who are important to me think I

should use social media
A specific person (or group) is available for

assistance with social media difficulties
The use of LinkedIn remains predominant when recruiters assess the web reputation of a candidate (68%). The use of Facebook is also relevant (52%), especially if we consider that Facebook is generally regarded as a more personal social networking site. Interestingly, social media is used more often than traditional search engines (tab. 6). Tab. 6 - Social Networks and Online Tools Used to Check a Candidate's Online Reputation.
Total Survey, 2014.
Note: multiple choice question. Social Media
LinkedIn
Facebook
Google or other search engines
Instagram
Pinterest
Recruiters believe that the most attractive elements in the profiles of potential candidates for recruitment purposes are the previous work experiences (attractiveness index of 0.63), followed by the presence of professional prizes or awards (0.38) and the personality insights that can be identified from the profile (0.32). Recruiters seem to be largely uninterested in the number of contacts (tab. 7). The seeming lack of interest in the number of contacts shown by recruiters and the preference towards "tangible skills", may be interpreted as a tendency to assess more favorably those skills that are more difficult to make up (public display of previous work experience), whilst contact requests are often accepted by users without knowing the other person. In this sense, recruiters seem to distrust the number of contacts as a sort of "noisy" information that does not provide trustworthy elements for professional assessment. Tab. 7 - Attractiveness Index of the Applicant's Social Media Profile.
Total Survey, 2014.
Note: Index value from -1 (min attractiveness) to 1 (max attractiveness). Elements on Social Media profile
Professional experience
Professional prizes and awards
Personality emerging from profile
Content posted by the applicant
References and comments posted by others
Personal information (e.g. marital status, gender.)
Pictures
Hobbies and personal interests
Number of contacts
Approximately one third of recruiters admit that they have rejected a potential candidate as a consequence of the information, the pictures, or the content posted on the candidate's profile (fig. 16). This may be interpreted in two different ways. On one hand, candidates may be disqualified if they present information that differs substantially from the information provided in their CV; or they may be disqualified if their profiles display "sensitive" information. In this second case, a slight discrepancy emerges with the information provided by Job Seekers who seem to have a general awareness of the kind of information that may affect the Recruiters' opinion and largely state that they do not post sensitive comments or pictures. However, this tendency to post sensitive material seems to be greater among younger candidates. The rejection of candidates based on the content they posted online should probably be interpreted as a "strategy" perpetrated by the Recruiters to reduce the (often large) number of candidates for a position by searching for material that may not be "sensitive" per se, but sufficiently ambiguous to detrimentally affect one's reputation. Fig. 16 - Exclusion of a Candidate from the Recruitment Process because of Online Information, Photos, or Content
on Their Social Media Profile by Region.
Total Survey, 2014.
Eastern Europe and MENA Eastern Europe and Among the different elements which seem to negatively influence the assessment of the web reputation of a candidate, recruiters seem to pay particular attention to the comments posted, especially in relation to the participation of activities which may violate University or workplace policies, followed by comments on sensitive issues, whilst pictures are relatively less important in this regard. The age of the recruiter seems to have an impact on what they perceive to be content that negatively affects a candidate's web reputation. Younger recruiters appear to be less strict in relation to "sensitive" information (tab. 8). Tab. 8 - Impact Index of Web Reputation on Recruitment by Year of Birth of the Recruiter.
Total Survey, 2014.
Notes: (1) Index value from -1 (almost never negative evaluation of the recruiter) to 1 (always negative evaluation of the recruiter). (2) The analysis of recruiters born before 1946 (over 68 years old) has been omitted because of a limited sample size (3 respondents) Elements on applicant's Social
1946-1964
1965-1980
After 1981
Total Index
Media profile
Informal selfie or tagged photo

(e.g. wearing a swimsuit)
Controversial selfie / tagged photo

(e.g. drinking alcohol)
Comments on controversial topics

(e.g. illegal drugs)
Comments on participation in
activities which are in violation of

university or workplace policy
Among those who use social media for recruitment purposes, approximately 30% have attended training courses organized by their company (fig. 17). This percentage decreases further in the Southern European countries (26%) (fig. 18). Fig. 17 - Training Sessions (from company) About How to Recruit Using Social Media by Region.
Total Survey, 2014.
Eastern Europe and MENA % in total companies (2014 forecast) Training is more frequent in companies with 250+ employees and decreases with the size of the firm. Interestingly, for those who did not receive training, the expected usefulness of the training increases as the size of the firm grows. For those who did attend training courses, the greater perceived usefulness is reported for microbusinesses. This confirms the fact that small enterprises are less inclined to provide formation, but when this occurs, they experience a greater return, mostly because it represents a strong element of differentiation from their competitors (tab. 9). Tab. 9 - Training Sessions (from company) About How to Recruit Using Social Media
and Usefulness Indices About Training by Company Size.
Total Survey, 2014.
Note: Usefulness indices value from -1 (max usefulness) to 1 (max usefulness). The first is calculated using the responses by recruiters who have had training sessions and the second, by recruiters who have not had them. Usefulness
Usefulness
Training
Company size
sessions
training
potential
session made training session
Micro: < 10 people
Small: < 50
Medium: < 250
Large: over 250
Total companies
Similarly, throughout the various sectors, the companies that provide recruiters with the most training on social media use for their professional activity are Recruiting Agencies, followed by Technology businesses. It seems, however, that the level of training provided by Recruitment Agencies is relatively low, as the anticipated usefulness of the sessions is higher than the actual usefulness experienced by recruiters. The opposite holds true for the other industries which provide social media training, as the expected usefulness among employees is lower compared to its actual usefulness (tab. 10). Tab. 10 - Training Sessions (from company) About How to Recruit Using Social Media and Usefulness Indices About
Training by Industry (first 4).
Total Survey, 2014.
Note: Usefulness indices value from -1 (max uselessness) to 1 (max usefulness). The first is calculated using the responses by recruiters who have had training sessions and the second, by recruiters who have not had them. Usefulness
Usefulness
Training
Industry
sessions
training
potential
session made training session
Recruiting
Industrial Goods & Services
Technology
Food & Beverage
Total companies
61% of respondents either did not receive guidelines for the use of social media or were unaware that these guidelines existed. Tab 1.A - Do you have an account on these social networks? If yes, is this for personal or professional use?
Total Survey, 2014.
personal use professional Facebook
LinkedIn
Pinterest
Instagram
Tab 2.A - Does your company have an active presence on these social networks for recruiting purposes?
If yes, since when?
Total Survey, 2014.

Facebook
LinkedIn
Pinterest
Instagram
Tab 3.A – Is the professional use of social media in recruitment in your company?
Total Survey, 2014.
Voluntary
Highly recommended
Mandatory
Tab 4.A - Do you use social networks for the following recruiting activities?
Total Survey, 2014.
Employer branding
Advertising jobs
Sourcing passive candidates
Receiving job applications
Checking the accuracy of an applicant's CV
Checking an applicant's network
Checking content posted by an applicant
Checking reference of an applicant
Tab 5.A - What social networks and online tools do you use to check a candidate's online reputation?
Total Survey, 2014.
Facebook
LinkedIn
Pinterest
Instagram
Google or other search engines
Tab 6.A - Recruiting Objectives for Using Social Media.
Total Survey, 2014.
To improve the quality of applications
To increase the number of applications
To quickly fill an open vacancy
To decrease the budget of recruitment
To reach targeted applicants (e.g. demographics)
To diversify recruitment channels
Tab 7.A - From 1 to 5, how effective do you find these social networks for recruiting?
Total Survey, 2014.
Facebook
LinkedIn
Pinterest
Instagram
Tab 8.A - Have you ever excluded a candidate from the recruitment process because of online information, photos
or content on their social media profile?
Total Survey, 2014.
Tab 9.A - From 1 to 5, how likely are you to negatively assess a job applicant
with the following items on his/her Facebook profile?
Total Survey, 2014.
participation in activities which are in violation of university or workplace 1 (very unlikely)
3 (neutral)
5 (very likely)
Tab 10.A - From 1 to 5, how much do the following attract your attention on an applicant's social media profile?
Total Survey, 2014.
Personal information (e.g. marital status, gender.)
Personality emerging from profile
Pictures
Professional experience
Number of contacts
Hobbies and personal interests
Professional prizes and awards
References and comments posted by others
Content posted by the applicant
Tab 11.A - Regarding the use of social media in your job as a recruiter, please indicate the level of your agreement or
disagreement with the following statements on a scale of 1 to 7.
Total Survey, 2014.
I find social media useful in my job
Using social media increases my
productivity
It is easy for me to master social

media
People who are important to me

think I should use social media
In general, my company supports

the use of social media
I have the resources necessary to

use social media
I have the knowledge necessary to

use social media
A specific person (or group) is
available for assistance with social

media difficulties
I intend to use social media in the

next 12 months
Tab 12.A - What percentage of your total recruitment activity involves the internet?
Total Survey, 2014.
In 2014 (forecast)
Tab 13.A - Assuming total online recruitment is 100, what share does each tool represent?
Total Survey, 2014.
Careers section on company website
Online recruiting sites
Social media
Mobile apps
Tab 14.A - Do you think the importance of the following recruitment tools will change in your company next
year? Total Survey, 2014.
Careers section on recruiting sites Less important
No change
More important
Tab 15.A - Have you had (from your company) any training sessions about how to recruit using social media?
Total Survey, 2014.
Tab 16.A – Was the training session helpful?
Total Survey, 2014.
Note: Statistic calculated only for "Yes" answers of Tab. 16.A. 1 (not at all)
4 (neutral)
Tab 17.A - Do you think such training could be useful?
Total Survey, 2014.
Note: Statistic calculated only for "No" answers of Tab. 16.A. 1 (not at all)
4 (neutral)
Tab 8.A - Does your company have any guidelines or policy to manage social media? (e.g. crisis situations, day-to-
day social media scenarios.).
Total Survey, 2014.
I don't know
Tab 19.A - What kind of candidate profiles do you search for on social networks?
Total Survey, 2014.
Non Manager
Middle manager
Senior manager and above
Controlling, Accounting & Finance
Purchasing
Research & Development
Information Technology
Logistics
Marketing
Corporate Communication & PR
Human Resources
Quality Management
Tab 20.A - Gender.
Total Survey, 2014.
Tab 21.A - Year of birth.
Total Survey, 2014.
Before 1946
1946-1964
1965-1980
After 1981
Tab 22.A - What is the highest level of education you have completed?
Total Survey, 2014.
Less than High School
High School
Some College
2 or 3 year College Degree
4 or 5 year College Degree
Master or Doctoral Degree
Tab 23.A - How many years of experience do you have as a recruiter?
Total Survey, 2014.
1 year or less
3-5 years
6-10 years
11-20 years
More than 20 years
Tab 24.A - What is your position?
Total Survey, 2014.
Non manager
Middle manager
Senior manager and above
Tab 25.A - Company size.
Total Survey, 2014.
Micro: < 10 people
Small: < 50
Medium: < 250
Large: over 250
Tab 26.A - Does your company have a corporate website?
Total Survey, 2014.
Tab 28.A - Business area.
Total Survey, 2014.
Chemicals
Basic Resources
Construction & Materials
Industrial Goods & Services
Automobiles & Parts
Food & Beverage
Personal & Household Goods
Health Care
Travel & Leisure
Utilities
Insurance
Real Estate
Financial Services
Technology
Recruiting



Silvia Zanella is ththe world's leading provider of HR solutions. Her focus is on HR 2.0, with a strong interest in the future of work. Ivana Pais is an Assistant Professor of Economic Sociology at Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Milano (Italy). Her research interests focus on new ways of working through the use of social media. About the Adecco Group The Adecco Group, based in Zurich, Switzerland, is the world's leading provider of HR solutions. With over 31,500 FTE employees and more than 5,000 branches, in over 60 countries and territories around the world, Adecco Group offers a wide variety of services, connecting more than 650,000 associates with our clients every day. The services offered fall into the broad categories of temporary staffing, permanent placement, career transition and talent development, as well as outsourcing and consulting. The Adecco Group is a Fortune Global 500 company. Adecco S.A. is registered in Switzerland (ISIN: CH0012138605) and listed on the SIX Swiss Exchange (ADEN).

Source: http://www.adecco.mu/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/adecco-global-social-recruiting-survey-global-report.pdf

hands2elbowsurgeon.co.uk

A non-surgical treatment for Dupuytren's contracture1* Your guide to The information in this guide is for educational purposes only and is not intended as a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Please refer to the Xiapex Package Information for full safety and product information.*Xiapex is for adults with a rope-like cord that can be felt beneath the skin of the palm (also known as a palpable cord)1

15828-arquidiocesis de bogota-plan e documento final.indd

Vicaría de Evangelización © Arquidiócesis de Bogotá, 2013 PLAN DE EVANGELIZACIÓN Portada: Panorámica del Centro Internacional y los cerros en Bogotá Vicaría de Evangelización Arquidiócesis de Bogotá Archivo de la Arquidiócesis de Bogotá Juan Carlos Ramos Hendez Diseño, diagramación: Juan Carlos Ramos Hendez ISPA. Instituto San Pablo Apóstol © Todos los derechos reservados